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Introduction

Covid-19 is a novel coronavirus that was first identified in 2019. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is working closely with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and other federal partners to learn more about this virus, which causes the disease known as Covid-19. As we learn more about Covid-19, we will provide updated information on this page about the risks posed by covid-19 to people and animals, including pets.

Covid-19 is a respiratory illness in humans that is caused by infection with the SARS-CoV-2 virus. This virus is similar to other coronaviruses that cause respiratory illnesses in humans, such as severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV) and Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV). These other coronaviruses have also caused respiratory illness in animals, including camels, cats, and bats.

The SARS-CoV-2 virus is thought to spread mainly from person to person through close contact, such as when an infected person coughs or sneezes on someone else or through contact with droplets from an infected personufffds nose or mouth that land on someone elseufffds nose or mouth. It may also be possible for a person to get Covid-19 by touching a surface or object that has the virus on it and then touching their own nose or mouth. However, this is not thought to be the main way the virus spreads.

There is currently no evidence that companion animals, including pets, can spread Covid-19 to people. However, since animals can sometimes carry other germs that can make people sick, itufffds always a good idea to wash your hands after contact with pets or other animals. If you are sick with Covid-19, it’s best to restrict contact with pets and have another member of your household take care of them if possible. If you must care for your pet while you are sick with Covid_19, wear a face mask when you are around them; donufffdt share food; maintain good hand hygiene; avoid kissing or snuggling them; put them outside if possible; disinfect their food and water bowls, bedding material; bathe them as appropriate; avoid taking them to public places; and consult your veterinarian if they show any sign of illness .

What is Covid-19?

Covid-19 is a virus that primarily affects humans. However, there have been a small number of confirmed cases in animals, including pets. The risk of animals contracting Covid-19 from people is low, and there is no evidence that animals can spread the virus to people. However, the FDA is still investigating the potential risk of animals spreading the virus to people and is working with animal health experts to monitor the situation.

What are the symptoms of Covid-19 in pets?

There are no reported cases of pets becoming sick with Covid-19 in the U.S., but the virus has been found in some animals in other countries. The risk of pets becoming sick with Covid-19 is thought to be low, but itufffds important to take precautions to protect them.

The symptoms of Covid-19 in pets are similar to those in people, and may include coughing, sneezing, fever and difficulty breathing. If your pet is showing any of these symptoms, call your veterinarian right away.

To help prevent the spread of Covid-19, the FDA recommends avoiding contact with pet food or products that may have been contaminated with the virus. Itufffds also important to wash your hands after handling your pet or their food and toys.

How does Covid-19 spread among pets?

Currently, there is no evidence that animals play a significant role in the spread of SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19. However, it is possible that animals could be infected with the virus and could spread it to other animals or people.

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is aware of a small number of pets, mostly dogs, reported to be infected with SARS-CoV-2 in the United States. There have also been reports of a few cats and ferrets being infected with the virus in other countries. The FDA is working with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) to collect information about these cases and will continue to provide updates as more information becomes available.

While the risk of infection for animals appears to be low at this time, CDC recommends taking precautions to protect your pets from coronaviruses, including SARS-CoV-2:

ufffd Wash your hands thoroughly with soap and water for at least 20 seconds before and after handling your pet or their food/treats/toys/bedding/litterbox, etc. If soap and water are not available, use an alcohol-based hand sanitizer that contains at least 60% alcohol. Avoid contact with your face (eyes, nose or mouth) while cleaning up after your pet;

ufffd If you are sick with COVID-19 or think you might have it (including mild symptoms), restrict contact with your pet ufffdjust like you would around other peopleufffd; have another member of your household take care of walking, feeding and playing with your pet; donufffdt share food/treats; avoid kissing or snuggling them close to your face; put a mask on if you must care for them while you are sick; And donufffdt take them to the vet unless it is absolutely necessary ufffd call ahead first;

ufffd Dogs can sometimes get other coronaviruses that make them sick; there is currently no evidence that these coronaviruses can infect people or spread from dogs to people ufffd however ufffd itufffds always a good idea to practice good hygiene habits around any animal (wash hands thoroughly before and after contact); avoid kissing dogs on the face or letting them lick your face; ensure puppies and other pets stay healthy by regularly taking them to the vet for checkups/vaccinations (as recommended by your veterinarian);

ufffd Keep cats indoors ufffdas much as possibleufffd so they donufffdt interact with other animals outside that could be carrying the virus; if they must go outside, consider wearing a mask while they are outside; keep their litterbox clean ufffd wash hands thoroughly afterwards.

How can you protect your pet from Covid-19?

Although there have been no reports of pets becoming ill with Covid-19 in the United States, the FDA is reminding pet owners that itufffds important to take precautions to protect your pet from the virus.

There is currently no evidence that pets can transmit Covid-19 to people, but it is still possible for people to spread the virus to animals. The best way to protect your pet is to limit their exposure to other people and animals, as well as to clean their food and water bowls, toys, and bedding regularly.

If you are sick with Covid-19, it is important to keep your pets away from other people and animals as much as possible. You should also wash your hands before and after contact with your pet, and avoid kissing or sharing food with them.

What should you do if your pet shows symptoms of Covid-19?

If your pet shows signs of respiratory illness, such as difficulty breathing, increased respiratory rate or effort, please contact your veterinarian. Your veterinarian will work with you to determine if your pet needs to be seen and what type of diagnostic testing or treatment may be required.

There is no evidence at this time that companion animals, including pets, can spread COVID-19 to people. However, because all animals can carry germs that can make people sick, itufffds always a good idea to practice healthy habits around pets and other animals, including:

-Washing your hands before and after contact with animals, their food, and their waste

-Avoiding kisses and licks from animals

-Ensuring puppies and kittens are up to date on their vaccinations before they interact with other animals or people outside the home

Can humans get Covid-19 from pets?

There is no evidence that animals play a significant role in spreading the virus that causes COVID-19, according to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. However, itufffds still possible that humans can get the virus from contact with animals, so itufffds important to take precautions.

The FDA recommends that people avoid contact with sick animals and wash their hands after contact with any animal, even if they donufffdt appear sick. The agency also recommends against bringing sick animals into homes with people who are at higher risk for severe illness from COVID-19, such as older adults and people with underlying medical conditions.

There is currently no evidence to suggest that pet products, such as food or supplements, pose a risk for exposure to the virus that causes COVID-19. However, the FDA is continuing to evaluate this issue and will provide updates as more information becomes available.

Treatment and Prevention of Covid-19 in Pets

There is currently no evidence that animals or pets can spread COVID-19 to people. However, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) considers it a good idea to avoid contact with animals if you are sick with COVID-19.

The best way to protect your pet from COVID-19 is to follow the same basic recommendations for preventing the spread of any respiratory disease:

-Wash your hands before and after handling your pet

-Avoid kissing or letting your pet lick your face

-Cover your coughs and sneezes

-Keep your pet up-to-date on vaccinations

If you are sick with COVID-19, the CDC recommends that you:

-Restrict contact with pets and other animals, just like you would around other people

-Have another member of your household take care of walking, feeding, and playing with your pet while you are sick

-Avoid contact with your pet’s food, water bowls, and litter box

FAQs about Covid-19 and Pets

Q. Has the FDA received any reports of companion animals, such as pets, becoming sick with Covid-19?

A. No. At this time, the risk of animals becoming sick with Covid-19 is considered to be low. However, since animals can sometimes contract and spread other viruses to people, itufffds always a good idea to wash your hands after contact with pets and other animals.

Q: What is the risk of contracting Covid-19 from pet products?

A: There is no evidence at this time that pet foods or other pet products are contaminated with or capable of spreading Covid-19. However, it is always a good idea to wash your hands after handling any pet food or product.

Q: Iufffdve heard that some people in the U.S. have been infected with Covid-19 after contact with camels, chickens, and pigs in other countries. Is there a risk of my pet contracting Covid-19 from these animals?

A: At this time, there is no evidence that companion animals in the U.S., such as dogs and cats, can contract or spread Covid-19. However, some other animal species, such as camels, chickens, and pigs, have been found to be infected with Covid-19 in other countries. If you have recently traveled to an area where these animals are found and you are concerned about your petufffds health, please speak with your veterinarian.

Conclusion

The answer to this question is still unknown. The FDA is aware that some people are concerned about the risk of contracting COVID-19 from their pets or other animals. Although there have been a small number of reported cases of pets and other animals becoming sick with COVID-19 globally, the risk of animals spreading the virus to people is considered to be low. However, because all animal species can carry germs that can make people sick, itufffds always a good idea to practice healthy habits around your pets and other animals, such as washing your hands before and after contact.

The “can cats get covid-19 symptoms” is a question that asks whether or not cats can get Covid 19. The answer to this question is no, and the symptoms of the disease are listed in detail.

External References-

https://www.webmd.com/lung/coronavirus-transmission-overview#:~:text=A%20few%20pets%20have%20tested,humans%20who%20were%20infected.

https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/daily-life-coping/animals.html#:~:text=%E2%80%A2%20People%20with%20suspected%20or,livestock%2C%20and%20wildlife.

https://www.fda.gov/emergency-preparedness-and-response/coronavirus-disease-2019-covid-19/covid-19-frequently-asked-questions#:~:text=If%20you%20are%20sick%20with,in%20the%20same%20bed.

https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/daily-life-coping/animals.html#:~:text=There%20is%20no%20evidence%20that,but%20this%20is%20rare.

https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/daily-life-coping/animals.html

https://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/coronavirus/expert-answers/can-pets-get-coronavirus/faq-20486391

https://theconversation.com/should-we-be-worried-about-our-pet-cats-and-dogs-getting-covid-186486

About the Author

Jamie Dawson

-I like pets more than their owners! #petlover.

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